ASNC Tripos, Part II

The three year ASNC tripos is divided into two main academic phases - Part I and Part II (described here). Part I spans two years and consists of the 'Prelim to Part I' year (first year of study) and the 'Part I' year (second year of study). Students then move onto Part II (the third and final year).

Part II Candidates

Candidates for Part II must offer four papers, chosen from Papers 1-18 below, plus a compulsory Dissertation; no more than one paper may be chosen from among Papers 13-18. As one of their four papers, candidates may offer one paper from Papers 1-10 of Part I, provided that the choice complies with certain regulations - for more details, click here.

It may be possible for students who have successfully completed Part I of a different Tripos to take ASNC Part II over two years. There are special regulations for this - for more details, click here.

Part II Papers

  1. A subject in Anglo-Saxon history: The Anglo-Saxon Chancery
  2. A subject in Scandinavian history of the Viking Age: The Coming of Christianity
  3. A subject in Celtic History: Sea Kings and the Celtic Speaking World, c.1014-1164
  4. A subject in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic History: Law and Lawlessnes
  5. A subject in Old English literature: Beowulf
  6. Advanced medieval Scandinavian language and literature
  7. Advanced medieval Welsh language and literature
  8. Advanced medieval Irish language and literature
  9. A subject in Insular Latin literature: Writing Women
  10. Textual criticism
  11. Germanic philology
  12. Celtic philology
  1. Dissertation [compulsory]

Borrowed papers for the academic year 2014-15

  1. Medieval English literature, 1066-1500: Medieval Supernatural(Faculty of English, Part II, Paper 6)
  2. A subject in medieval European History: The city of Rome and its rulers, 476-769 (Faculty of History, Part IIB)
  3. a) Historical Linguistics (MML, Linguistics Tripos, Part II, Paper 11)
    b) The History of the English Language (MML, Linguistics Tripos, Part II, Paper 13) - NOT RUNNING IN 2014-15
  4. The North Sea in the Early Medieval Ages (Division of Archaeology, Paper ARC26)
  5. Europe in Late Antiquity and the Migration Period (Division of Archaeology, Paper ACR27)
  6. Topics in Medieval Studies: Defining the Human (MML, Department of French, Part II, FR7)
  7. England before the Norman Conquest (ASNC Part I, Paper 1)
  8. Scandinavian history in the Viking Age (ASNC Part I, Paper 2)
  9. The Brittonic-speaking peoples from the fourth century to the twelfth (ASNC Part I, Paper 3)
  10. The Gaelic-speaking peoples from the fourth century to the twelfth (ASNC Part I, Paper 4)
  11. Old English language and literature (ASNC Part I, Paper 5)
  12. Old Norse language and literature (ASNC Part I, Paper 6)
  13. Medieval Welsh language and literature (ASNC Part I, Paper 7)
  14. Medieval Irish language and literature (ASNC Part I, Paper 8)
  15. Insular Latin language and literature (ASNC Part I, Paper 9)
  16. Palaeography and codicology (ASNC Part I, Paper 10)

     


  1. A subject in Anglo-Saxon History: The Anglo-Saxon Chancery

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR. DAVID WOODMAN
    An advanced topic in the history and civilisation of England from the age of the Anglo-Saxon settlements to the Norman Conquest. Students will be required to use primary sources in the original language or in translation.

    Set for this year: The Anglo-Saxon Chancery

    This course involves the study of Anglo-Saxon charters (documents recording royal grants of land and privileges to ecclesiastics, religious houses and laymen), from their introduction in the seventh century to the Norman Conquest. Attention is given to their development in form and substance, to their criticism, to the changing circumstances of their production, and to their value for historical purposes.

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  3. A subject in Scandinavian history: The coming of Christianity

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR ELIZABETH ROWE
    An advanced topic in the history and civilisation of Scandinavia in the Viking Age, and of Scandinavian expansion, except in so far as that is included in Papers 1 and 4of Part I or Papers 1 and 4of Part II. Students will be required to use primary sources in the original language or in translation.

    Set for this year: The coming of Christianity.

    This course examines the coming of Christianity to the Scandinavian peoples in the ninth, tenth and eleventh centuries. The literary sources include sagas, and hagiographical and narrative works; archaeology, too, provides important evidence of the process of the integration of Christianity into a pagan society.

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  5. A subject in Celtic history: Sea Kings and the Celtic Speaking World c. 1014-1164

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR. FIONA EDMONDS AND DR. PHIL DUNSHEA
    This course is aimed at students who have taken either the History of the Brittonic-speaking peoples or the History of the Gaelic-speaking peoples (or both of these courses) at Part I. It will provide such students with an opportunity to study in greater detail a number of the territories which they have already encountered, through the medium of a range of primary sources.

    Set for this year: Sea Kings and the Celtic Speaking World, c. 1014-1164

    The history of the Irish Sea region, the Hebrides and Argyll in the eleventh and twelfth centuries is an enigmatic, but engaging, topic. The area’s history is punctuated by the stories of colourful characters. The Welsh king Gruffudd ap Cynan grew up in Dublin after his father was expelled from Gwynedd, but Gruffudd and his Hiberno-Norse allies launched an attack on Gwynedd in order to reclaim his inheritance. The Gaelic-Scandinavian dynast Somerled held sway over a seemingly autonomous kingdom which comprised coastal areas of mainland Scotland and numerous islands. Yet texts written in milieux favourable to the king of Scots presented Somerled as a rebellious traitor. The extraordinary story of Bishop Wimund, a monk of Furness and bishop of Man, also draws attention. This cleric raised a fleet to attack the Scottish kingdom, claiming that he had an ancestral right to lands there.

    These stories illustrate trends which can be plotted throughout the period. The eleventh and early twelfth centuries witnessed the growth of the kingdom of the Scots, and consolidation of widespread political power in Ireland in the hands of a select few dynasties. In Wales , an extensive hegemony developed under the aegis of Gruffudd ap Llywelyn. Yet the sea-kings managed to preserve some autonomy, even in the face of these developments. The cultural milieux in which the sea-kings operated also bear consideration: a complex mixture of Gaelic-, Brittonic- and Norse-speaking populations dwelt in Galloway and Strathclyde, but these territories nevertheless produced coherent political entities.

    The primary sources which will be studied during the course are available in print, and most of them exist in recent and accessible editions and translations. The last two decades have witnessed a steady flow of publications on the topic, with the result that the body of secondary literature is now fairly extensive. These works will aid Part II students, but they will also find that this paper offers considerable scope for original thought and research.

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  7. A subject in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic History: Law and Lawlessness

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR PHIL DUNSHEA
    This course will provide students with an opportunity to study in greater detail a theme which is touched on by many of the Part I papers, namely how the behaviour of individuals and groups of individuals was moderated and controlled in medieval societies. The following questions may be considered: Who exerted control and how? What were the limits of that control? What happened when the limits were exceeded? What sanctions could be applied, and by whom and to whom? How are these legal institutions represented in our sources and how far can they be seen to change over time?
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  9. A subject in Old English literature: Beowulf

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR RICHARD DANCE
    The work of an author or a group of authors, or a group of texts, or a literary topic or genre within the field of Old English literature, will be prescribed for special study. Students will be required to use primary sources in the original language.

    Set for this year: Beowulf.

    This course is devoted to the study of the poem Beowulf, and students will be expected to get to know the poem fully. The course tackles the poem from various different angles: the date and circumstances of composition; literary analogues from other Germanic and Anglo-Latin literature; presentation of themes such as religion, kingship, ethics, the heroic ideal, and much more.

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  11. Advanced medieval Scandinavian language and literature

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR JUDY QUINN
    In this course students will study Old Norse Poetics and Old Norse prosimetrum in depth. Texts, including legendary sagas, kings' sagas and family sagas will be read, along with a range of poems and verses. Students will be required to translate extracts from these set texts, to translate unseen passages, and also to write essays on selected topics in medieval Scandinavian literature.
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  13. Advanced medieval Welsh language and literature

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR MÁIRE NÍ MHAONAIGH
    Welsh language and literature from the beginnings to the end of the Middle Ages are studied. There will be set texts in Old and Middle Welsh. Candidates will be required to translate extracts from these set texts and to translate unseen passages from Middle Welsh. There will be a further group of set texts, in medieval Breton and Cornish. Candidates will be required to translate and comment on extracts from these texts. They will also be required to write essays on selected topics in medieval Welsh, Breton, and Cornish language and literature.

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  15. Advanced Medieval Irish language and literature

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR MÁIRE NÍ MHAONAIGH
    Irish language and literature from the beginnings to the end of the Middle Ages are studied. There will be set texts in the original language. Students will be required to comment on extracts from these set texts and to translate unseen passages, and also to write essays on selected topics in medieval Irish literature.
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  17. A subject in Insular Latin literature: Writing Women

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR ROSALIND LOVE
    A subject in Insular Latin literature. The work of an author or a group of authors, or a group of texts, or a literary topic or genre within the field of Insular Latin literature, will be prescribed for special study. Students will be required to use primary sources in the original language.

    Set for this year: Writing Women .

    This course focuses on Insular Latin texts written by, for, and about women, and will include study of primary sources from a variety of literary genres, including letters, hagiography, secular biography, handbooks of spiritual guidance, and biblical commentary. The texts to be studied will cover both Anglo-Latin and Celtic Latin, and will range in date from the seventh to the eleventh century. Students will be required to translate and comment on extracts from the set texts, and also to write essays on selected topics relating to the sources studied during the year, including matters such as genre-expectation, audience, attitudes towards women’s status, images of female sanctity, misogyny

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  19. Textual criticism

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR ROSALIND LOVE
    An introduction to the processes by which extant sources written in the languages studied for Papers 5-9 have been transmitted, and of the scholarly methods by which these sources are converted into a readable form. The various editorial and diplomatic approaches and techniques are studied. In the exam, students will be required to answer a compulsory practical question and to write essays on selected topics.
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  21. Germanic philology

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR RICHARD DANCE
    The history and grammar of the Germanic languages will be studied, in relation to one another and to their Indo-European background. Candidates will be required to comment on passages in any two of Old English, Old Norse, Gothic and Old High German, and to write essays on selected topics.
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  23. Celtic philology

    PAPER COORDINATOR: DR MÁIRE NÍ MHAONAIGH
    The history and grammar of the Celtic languages will be studied, in relation to one another and to their Indo-European background. Students will be required to write essays on selected topics.
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  25. Medieval English literature, 1066-1500: Medieval Supernatural

    Borrowed from

    Faculty of English, Part II, Paper 6

    Paper co-ordinator: 

    Prof. Barry Windeatt (baw1000@cam.ac.uk).

    Initial meeting in Michaelmas:

    Thursday, 4th December 2014 (time TBC).

    Timetabled teaching:

    There are numerous courses which support teaching for this paper - see Notes on Courses (on the English student intranet).

    • 6 Seminars in LT - TBC
    • 6 Lectures in LT - TBC
    • 2 workshops in ET - TBC

    Organisation of supervisions:

    ASNC DoSs should contact supervisors to arrange the supervisions.

    Typical pattern of supervisions:

    Usually four supervisions in Lent, with one or two additional supervisions for revision in Easter

    Link to course description:

    Click here to see the Moodle site - not yet available (Raven Password protected - you must be signed up to the 'English Library' Moodle site to view this page)

    Click here to see the Faculty of English 'Notes on Courses' (Raven Password protected - you must be signed up to the 'Faculty of English' student intranet site to view this page)

    Click here to see the Faculty of English Reading Lists (Raven Password protected - you must be signed up to the 'Faculty of English' student intranet site to view this page)

     

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  27. The city of Rome and its rulers, 476–769

    Borrowed from

    Faculty of History, Part IIB

    Paper co-ordinator:  

    Professor Rosamond McKitterick (rdm21@cam.ac.uk)

    Initial meeting in Michaelmas:

    First lecture: Thursday, 9 October 2014 10am-12 noon, History Faculty Building.

    Timetabled teaching:

    • 8 one-hour lectures in MT and 8 in LT - Tuesdays, 11am.
    • 8 two-hour classes in MT, 8 in LT and 1 in ET - Thursdays, 10am-12noon.
    • A three-day field trip to Rome 7-9 January 2015.
    • Every student gives three presentations each term, usually working to complement at least one other presenter in that class.

    Organisation of supervisions:

    There are no individual supervisions for this paper.

    Typical pattern of supervisions:

    N/A

    Link to course description:

    The City of Rome course description 2014-15

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  29. a) Historical Linguistics

    Borrowed from

    MML, Linguistics Tripos Part II: Paper 11
    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS PAPER RUNS ON ALTERNATE YEARS AND WILL BE SUSPENDED IN 2015-16

    Paper co-ordinator: 

    David Willis (dwew2@cam.ac.uk)

    Initial meeting in Michaelmas:

    No initial meeting. Please ensure that you notify the Linguistics department secretary that you intend to take the course, ideally by the end of June.

    Timetabled teaching:

    • Lectures (all weeks, MT & LT), Mondays 10-11am.
    • Practical classes (even weeks, MT only), Wednesdays 10-11am.
    • 8 supervisions spread across the year.

    Organisation of supervisions:

    Supervisions will be organised by the course co-ordinator/department. You will receive an email just before the start of Michaelmas Term telling you about your supervision group.

    Typical pattern of supervisions:

    3 supervisions in Michaelmas, 4 in Lent, 1 revision supervision in Easter, all in groups of 2–3.

    Link to course description:

    http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/dtal/courses/ugrad/p11_HistLing.html or http://www.ling.cam.ac.uk/li11/li11_contents.htm

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    b)
    The History of the English Language

    Borrowed from

    MML, Linguistics Tripos Part II: Paper 13
    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS PAPER RUNS ON ALTERNATE YEARS AND WILL BE SUSPENDED IN 2014-15.

    Paper co-ordinator: 

    David Willis (dwew2@cam.ac.uk)

    Initial meeting in Michaelmas:

    N/A for 2014-15.

    Timetabled teaching:

    • 8 one-hour lectures in MT and 8 in LT,
    • 8 practical classes (language and corpus work),
    • 8 supervisions spread across the year.

    Organisation of supervisions:

    Supervisions will be organised by the course co-ordinator/department.

    Typical pattern of supervisions:

    3 supervisions in Michaelmas, 4 in Lent, 1 revision supervision in Easter, all in groups of 2–3.

    Link to course description:

    http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/dtal/courses/ugrad/p13_HistEng.html

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  31. The North Sea in the Early Middle Ages

    Borrowed from:

    Division of Archaeology, Paper ARC26

    Paper co-ordinator: 

    Dr Susanne Hakenbeck (seh43@cam.ac.uk)

    Initial meeting in Michaelmas:

    First lecture: 14 October, 2014. 

    Timetabled teaching:

    • Lectures: one hour each week (MT, LT and ET) - TBA.
    • 5 practical sessions - Wednesday afternoons 2-4pm (MT & LT) - TBA
    • Assessment by exam (80%) and practical project (20%).

    Organisation of supervisions:

    Please contact Dr Hakenbeck.

    Typical pattern of supervisions:

    3-4 per term

    Link to course description:

    The North Sea in the Early Middle Ages - course description

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  33. Europe in Late Antiquity and the Migration Period

    Borrowed from

    Division of Archaeology, Paper ARC27

    Paper co-ordinator: 

    Dr Susanne Hakenbeck (seh43@cam.ac.uk)

    Initial meeting in Michaelmas:

    First lecture: 16 October, 2014.

    Timetabled teaching:

    • Lectures: one hour each week (MT & LT) - TBA.
    • Three practical sessions - Wednesday afternoons 2-4pm (MT & LT) - TBA
    • One field trip

    Organisation of supervisions:

    Please contact Dr Hakenbeck.

    Typical pattern of supervisions:

    3-4 per term

    Link to course description:

    Europe in Late Antiquity and the Migration Period - course description

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  35. Topics in Medieval Studies: Defining the Human

    Borrowed from

    MML, Department of French, Part II, FR7

    Paper co-ordinator: 

    Prof. Sylvia Huot (sh225@cam.ac.uk)

    Initial meeting in Michaelmas:

    Arranged by each supervisor with their students

    Timetabled teaching:

    • 2 classes at the beginning of MT to introduce students to reading Old French (TBC)
    • 8 Lectures in MT, 8 in LT and 4 in ET - TBC.

    Organisation of supervisions:

    Contact paper convenor to make arrangements.

    Typical pattern of supervisions:

    A mix of essays and commentary work. Choice of texts determined by agreement between students and their supervisor. Fortnightly through the year. Ten in all. Normally all with the same supervisor, with 2-3 students per group.

    Link to course description:

    http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/french/courses/ugrad/new_fr7.html

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